Category Archives: Sexism

and another thing… more about breast cancer

A couple of weeks ago, we spent our hour exploring the Politics of Breast Cancer (you can find the audio further down the page, under the heading ‘Think Pink’. The main question driving the episode is why environmental and occupational causes of breast cancer are rarely brought up in the mainstream activism around cancer. According to David Christiani “…the most valuable approaches to reducing cancer morbidity and mortality lie in primary prevention – avoiding the introduction of carcinogenic agents into the environment and eliminating exposure to carcinogenic agents that are already there” (New England Journal of Medicine, 2011). But stopping or reducing occupational exposures to carcinogens and eliminating toxins from the air, water and products around us is fundamentally a social justice issue. Spending money on employee’s safety and making products safer cuts into corporate profits.

We start off with an interview with Joy, a breast cancer “survivor” (although she finds the term problematic for reasons she discusses). Joy did not have the typical risk factors people associate with breast cancer. She had no family history, exercised regularly and ate well. So why did she get cancer? Joy discusses why she would like to see more of a focus on the environmental causes of breast cancer.

Next we interview Karuna Jaggar, the executive director of Breast Cancer Action (http://bcaction.org/). Breast Cancer Action is a national organization in the United States that calls for the elimination of environmental toxins that cause cancer and accountability for the corporate-driven pink ribbon campaign in their “Think Before You Pink” campaign. Karuna discusses how the pink ribbon is not regulated and criticizes corporate “pink washing” where a company tries to divert attention from their toxic products by branding them with the pink ribbon. Other questions she encourages people to inquire about are how much money actually goes to breast cancer. Overall, we conclude that in order to truly fight the breast cancer epidemic, stronger environmental laws and regulations are urgently needed.

In case you’re interested, here’s an organization with information about everyday products that cause cancer http://www.preventcancer.com/. Although individual consumer choice alone is inadequate and is often unfeasible, it’s nice that some researchers and community members are trying to provide us with some evidence-based information about how to protect ourselves.

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Think before you Pink: the politics of breast cancer | rabble.ca

Think before you Pink: the politics of breast cancer | rabble.ca.

In this episode of People’s Health Radio, we explore the Politics of Breast Cancer. The main question driving this episode is why environmental and occupational causes of breast cancer are rarely brought up in the mainstream activism around cancer. According to David Christiani “…the most valuable approaches to reducing cancer morbidity and mortality lie in primary prevention – avoiding the introduction of carcinogenic agents into the environment and eliminating exposure to carcinogenic agents that are already there” (New England Journal of Medicine, 2011). But stopping or reducing occupational exposures to carcinogens and eliminating toxins from the air, water and products around us is fundamentally a social justice issue. Spending money on employee’s safety and making products safer cuts into corporate profits.

We start off with an interview with Joy, a breast cancer “survivor” (although she finds the term problematic for reasons she discusses). Joy did not have the typical risk factors people associate with breast cancer. She had no family history, exercised regularly and ate well. So why did she get cancer? Joy discusses why she would like to see more of a focus on the environmental causes of breast cancer.

Next we interview Karuna Jaggar, the executive director of Breast Cancer Action (http://bcaction.org/). Breast Cancer Action is a national organization in the United States that calls for the elimination of environmental toxins that cause cancer and accountability for the corporate-driven pink ribbon campaign in their “Think Before You Pink” campaign. Karuna discusses how the pink ribbon is not regulated and criticizes corporate “pink washing” where a company tries to divert attention from their toxic products by branding them with the pink ribbon. Other questions she encourages people to inquire about are how much money actually goes to breast cancer. Overall, we conclude that in order to truly fight the breast cancer epidemic, stronger environmental laws and regulations are urgently needed.

In case you’re interested, here’s an organization with information about everyday products that cause cancer http://www.preventcancer.com/. Although individual consumer choice alone is inadequate and is often unfeasible, it’s nice that some researchers and community members are trying to provide us with some evidence-based information about how to protect ourselves.

Music: Keep going, by Invincible and Occupying Army by Vanessa Richards

Nine Month Blues: A look at women’s reproductive rights in Canada | rabble.ca

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN: Nine Month Blues: A look at women’s reproductive rights in Canada | rabble.ca.

From birth control, to abortion, to access to information and education, what’s happening with sexual health for women in Canada?

We talk to Greg Smith (Executive Director of https://www.optionsforsexualhealth.org/) and Joyce Arthur (Executive Director of the Abortion rights Coalition Of Canada – http://www.arcc-cdac.ca/home.html) about the lay of the land for women’s reproductive rights in Canada.  We also include audio from the audio documentary “The Women Are Coming” about the Abortion Caravan to fight for women’s right too access free and legal abortion.

Music by Peggy Seeger, the Gruff, Ani Difranco, the Great Lake Swimmers and Nellie McKay.

The title of this podcast is borrowed from the Peggy Seeger song “9 Month Blues”.

Suffer for your art: A look at musician health and safety | rabble.ca

CLICK TO LISTEN: Suffer for your art: A look at musician health and safety | rabble.ca.

On this show we take a look at the state of musician health and safety.  What are the hazards?   What protection do musicians have from injury and strain?  From electrocution to repetitive strain to addiction,  we take a look at the hazards musicians can risk in pursuit of their creative vision.

Includes interviews with Tim Tweedale (Headwater) and Leah Abramson (the Abramson Singers) about the hazards of being a working musician in Canada.

Music by Fred Eaglesmith, David Lindley and Wally Ingram, Headwater, the Abramson Singers, Janis Joplin and Amy Winehouse.

Mother’s Liberation: Care-giving under capitalism | rabble.ca

Mother’s Liberation: Examining Care-Giving under Capitalism

In recognition of the anti-imperialist pro-people history of Mother’s Day, People’s Health Radio joins moms in East Van and around the world as we reclaim this day as one of resistance against imperialist war and women’s oppression and exploitation.  PHR examines the health, social, and economic conditions of mothers, providing the unpaid care giving that allows public dollars to be diverted to privatization projects, imperialist occupation, and wars of aggression. 

Mother’s Liberation dreams of how mothers might be liberated from the isolating and at times grueling unpaid work of care giving under capitalism.

Featuring:

  • Valcina Cos, single mom, member of the Breakthrough Mamas
  • Suzanne Baustad, single mom, anti-poverty organizer, and founding member of Grassroots Women
  • Sophia Roberts, a high-school student, reading a Grassroots Women Mother’s Day statement
  • And speeches from the 2011 Mothers on the Move Mother’s Liberation Rally!

Is Capitalism a Disease? Rabble.ca

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN IN: http://rabble.ca/podcasts/shows/peoples-health-radio/2011/05/capitalism-disease

A re-broadcast of our very first show on PHR  – updated and remastered.

We talk to Richard Levins (John Rock Professor of Population Sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health) , Dennis Raphael (Professor of Health Policy and Management at York University)and Martha Roberts (Midwife, Community Organizer with the Alliance for People’s Health) asking the question:  Is Capitalism a disease?  Are structural inequality, class exploitation, racism and sexism making us sick?

We take the conversation about health beyond health care and look at health from a holistic perspective.  What does it mean to be sick, and to be well?  What does a healthy life look like?

We’ll be adding more resources on this over the next few days… so check back in soon!

Martin Luther King's Campaign for Economic Human Rights